This year marks Earth Day’s 50th anniversary, and that major milestone is cause for a serious celebration! Although we may be celebrating the planet and our treasured outdoor spaces in new ways this year to help protect ourselves and others during the pandemic, there are tons of fun opportunities to safely participate in the big anniversary.

Our partners have put together some of the best educational resources, sustainable challenges and awesome activities for you to take part in, so be sure to check out what’s happening on #OnTheCircuit here and by following us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Here are just five of the fabulous ways you can celebrate the 50 years of Earth Day:

Photo courtesy of TTF Watershed
  1. Join the TTF Watershed BioBlitz

If the Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed is near you, help identify its many species of plants and animals that live and grow by playing along in TTF Watershed’s week-long BioBlitz! All you have to do is use the free iNauturalist smartphone app or website to document your observations of plants, birds, bugs and more in the watershed. If the Tacony Creek park and trail are not in your local neighborhood, don’t worry–you can participate in your own yard. Learn more about the BioBlitz and how you can get involved here.

Photo courtesy of the Alliance for Watershed Education
  1. Enhance your environmental knowledge with the virtual programming from the AWE Centers

Did you know that this week is also Environmental Education Week? You can celebrate both Earth Day and Environmental Education Week by diving into the virtual programming from the Alliance for Watershed Education (AWE). Although the AWE Centers along the Circuit Trails may be temporarily closed, they are still serving up plenty of content to keep you engaged during these times. Check out the wide variety of free programming ranging from online exhibits to crafts, and videos to learn more about the environment and how to be a great steward here!

Photo courtesy of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail, painting by Nicky Belletier
  1. Submit artwork for the LHT Art Gallery

Share your artistic talents with the community! The Lawrence Hopewell Trail is creating a new LHT Art Gallery to showcase landscape paintings, drawings and photographs of the LHT. Commemorate Earth Day’s 50th anniversary by creating a new masterpiece to highlight the beauty of our trails #OnTheCircuit.

Photo courtesy of Schuylkill River Greenways
  1. Schuylkill River Greenways Earth Week Challenge

Challenge yourself to develop “green” habits with the Schuylkill River Greenways Earth Week Challenge. Throughout the challenge (and beyond!), prioritize taking care of our Earth by starting new sustainable habits and by continuing any you’ve already established, such as using a reusable water bottle, eliminating single-use plastic bags from your shopping sprees, spending time outdoors and much more! Download the Earth Week Challenge checklist to get started here.

Photo courtesy of Philadelphia Parks and Recreation
  1. Plug into Earth Week content from Parks & Rec at home

Philadelphia Parks and Recreation is keeping you going with daily live content to satisfy your outdoor craving even while at home! This week, they have a full line-up of special Earth Week content for you to enjoy. Tune in Philly in Bloom with TreePhilly at 3 p.m. on Thursday on the Parks and Rec Facebook page or log on at 3 p.m. Friday for nature watching from your windowsill.

Let us know how you are celebrating Earth Day online and at home this year by tagging us in your celebrations on and using the hashtag #OnTheCircuit!
 

Please note: As the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve locally, before visiting a trail in person, we recommend that you take precautions by doing the following:

  • Seek out and follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) most current public health and safety guidance here.
  • Refer to the guidance provided by your local/state government for more specific information about your community.
  • Come prepared with a cloth face covering
  • Stick to a trail near you and check with the local trail management organization to confirm the status of trail facilities. While many trails remain open, it is important to confirm before you head out. You can find a trail near you and contact information for your local trail management group using TrailLink.com.
  • If you plan to visit a trail, be prepared that some trails may have limited services, including closed facilities such as bathrooms, depots and visitor centers, and limited or no staff.

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